Science And Technology
Science And Technology

Faculty
* David Betsch
* Brian Blais
* Gaytha Langlois
* Dan McNally
* Hong Yang

Academics
* course descriptions
* minors programs
* student projects

Organizations
* center for sustainable business practices
* bryant env. society

Bryant University
* bryant home
* scitech home

Academics:course descriptions
200 Level 300 Level 400 Level
General Biology: SCI 251
General Science: SCI 260
Physical Geology: SCI 262
Astronomy: SCI 263
Physics: SCI 264
Chemistry: SCI 265
Oceanography: SCI 266
Special Topics in Science: SCI 285
Meteorology: SCI 287
Honors: Special Topics in Science: SCI 299
General Biology Laboratory: SCI L251
Physical Geology Laboratory: SCI L262
Astronomy Laboratory: SCI L263
Physics Laboratory: SCI L264
Chemistry Laboratory: SCI L265
Ecology: SCI 351
Nutrition: SCI 354
Energy Management Strategies: SCI 355
Introduction to Biotechnology: SCI 356
Human Sexuality: SCI 358
Applied Coastal Oceanography: SCI 366
Applied Genetics: SCI 370
Human Impact on Land and Life: SCI 371
Artificial Intelligence and Robotics: SCI 373
Environmental Study in China: SCI 375
Special Topics in Science: SCI 385
Science Internship: SCI 391
Directed Study in Science: SCI 397
Honors: Special Topics in Science: SCI 399
Ecology Laboratory: SCI L351
Energy Management Strategies Lab: SCI L355
Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Laboratory: SCI L373
Environmental Study in China Laboratory: SCI L375
Environmental Policy: SCI 455
Biotechnology Seminar: SCI 456
Special Topics in Science: SCI 485
Directed Study in Science: SCI 497
Honors: Special Topics in Science: SCI 499
Science and Technology in the Spring 2005 Semester
General Biology: SCI 251
A 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Unistructure 345 Angelyn M. Phillips
Sec B 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Unistructure 344 Dania E. Whitaker
Sec C 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Unistructure 345 David Betsch
Sec CE 6:30 pm - 9:10 pm T Unistructure 345 Paul Santoro
This lecture course is intended as a one-semester overview of biology. Emphasis is placed on the foundations of modern biology, including scientific methodology, a survey of organisms, cell theory, evolution, genetics (both classical and molecular), and ecology. Applications, such as biotechnology, are included when appropriate. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement. (3 lecture hours)
General Science: SCI 260
Sec A 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm TR Unistructure 344 Julia Crowley-Parmentier
The purpose of this survey course is to give the student a broad overview of modern science and to serve as a starting point for the study of other sciences. Topics include overviews of the major unifying principles of Physics, Chemistry, Earth Science, Biology, Meteorology, and Astronomy. Emphasis will be placed on scientific methodology and on the integration of the various science disciplines with each other and with other disciplines as well. (3 lecture hours)
Physical Geology: SCI 262
Sec A 9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF Unistructure 344 Dania E. Whitaker
Sec B 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Unistructure 344 Dania E. Whitaker
Sec C 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Unistructure 344 Julia Crowley-Parmentier
Sec JE 6:30 pm - 9:10 pm R Unistructure 345 Sandi L. Brenner
This course explores the cyclicality of geologic processes that shape the earth. Volcanic activity and earthquakes contribute to the building of mountains. Rivers and oceans help to destroy mountains. This simplistic idea is expanded to give the student a very good idea of "how the earth works." This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement. (3 lecture hours)
Astronomy: SCI 263
Sec A 9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF Unistructure 345 Brian S. Blais
Sec FE 6:30 pm - 9:10 pm W Unistructure 344 Francine Jackson
This general introductory course explores the fundamentals of astronomy. All branches of modern astronomy are covered. Major topics include the historical development of astronomy, the solar system, and the universe beyond. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement. (3 lecture hours)
Physics: SCI 264
Sec A 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Unistructure 345 Brian S. Blais
Sec AH 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Unistructure 345 Brian S. Blais
Session Cycle: Spring Yearly Cycle: Annual This course deals with some areas of physics, such as mechanics, heat, waves, sound, light, electricity, and modern atomic physics, primarily from a conceptual point of view. This course will be especially useful to students who plan to enter an industry in which an understanding of the physical laws of nature is desirable. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement. (3 lecture hours)
Chemistry: SCI 265
Sec A 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm TR Unistructure 345 David Betsch
Recommended for students who plan to enter an industry where a general knowledge of chemistry is desirable, the general principles of inorganic chemistry are covered in this course. The fields of organic chemistry and biochemistry are also surveyed. Atoms, molecules, and their chemical reactions are studied in depth and the use of chemicals in industry and the use of chemicals by living things are examined. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement. (3 lecture hours)
Oceanography: SCI 266
Sec A 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Unistructure 344 Dania E. Whitaker
The study of oceanography will provide students with an appreciation and a general familiarity with the ocean and with both coastal and open marine environments. This course will have an interdisciplinary focus in that it will emphasize the interactions that occur among the biological, chemical, geological, and physical phenomena of various marine environments from the beach to the open ocean. (3 lecture hours)
Special Topics in Science: SCI 285
This course focuses on selected topics in science, particularly topics that might raise ethical issues, address technological breakthroughs or review recent scientific research. Activities may include specialized research or writing projects, discussion of issues, oral presentations, guest speakers, and field trips. Prerequisite: At least one college-level science course. (3 lecture hours)
Meteorology: SCI 287
Meteorology is the study of our atmosphere, its structure, composition and origin as well as its dual roles as protector and devastator of the Earth. The study of humidity, cloud formation, precipitation, winds, air masses, cyclones, thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes will lead to weather forecasting. Such environmentally important issues as global warming and the ozone hole will be analyzed from several viewpoints. (3 lecture hours)
Honors: Special Topics in Science: SCI 299
Honors courses provide the opportunity for exceptional achievement. Instructors use methods and introduce concepts that will challenge the highly motivated student. Often interdisciplinary in approach and sometimes team taught, honors courses typically offer students occasions to extend their learning beyond the classroom. (3 lecture hours)
Ecology: SCI 351
Sec A 11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Unistructure 344 Gaytha A. Langlois
This course provides a review of ecological principles and selected research studies underlying these concepts, identifies techniques used by ecologists, and presents an overview of local and global environmental issues, including strategies for sustainability. In addition, the course emphasizes critical analysis of environmental problems and examines individual, group and governmental roles important to improving environmental quality. This course may be taken with a laboratory to fulfill the laboratory requirement. (3 lecture hours)
Nutrition: SCI 354
Sec AE 6:30 pm - 9:10 pm M Unistructure 345 Harry M. Robinson
Nutrition concerns the study of processes by which organisms ingest, digest, absorb, utilize, and excrete foods. Students will learn human diet and nutritional needs and develop the ability to think critically about nutrition claims and counterclaims in the marketplace. Recent advances in nutrition research, such as those related to weight loss, performance enhancement, and mood control, will also be covered. (3 lecture hours)
Energy Management Strategies: SCI 355
Sec A 9:30 am - 10:45 am TR Unistructure 344 Gaytha A. Langlois
Session Cycle: Fall and Spring Yearly Cycle: Annual In this course students review the principles of energy transformation, explore alternative energy resources and their feasibility, and assess current and future energy policy formation. In addition, students examine the economic and ecological impacts of various policy options and provide assistance in structuring institutional management plans for efficient energy use. (3 lecture hours
Introduction to Biotechnology: SCI 356
Sec CE 6:30 pm - 9:10 pm T Unistructure 344 David Betsch
Biotechnology is the commercial application of living organisms involving the deliberate manipulation of their DNA. As such, biotechnology broadly impacts commercial markets in human and animal health care, agriculture and horticulture, and the forensic sciences. Students will learn, through lectures and "hands on" laboratory experiences, about the biotechnology products and "new life forms" which have been or are about to be commercialized. Although this course involves significant "hands on" experiences, it does not fulfill the laboratory requirement. (3 lecture hours)
Human Sexuality: SCI 358
This course will instruct students in the cultural and social legacy of sexuality in American society. Students will also learn the details of human reproduction, development, and sexual maturation and consider the impacts of new technologies on reproductive health care. Sexually transmitted diseases, their biology and social implications, will also be covered. (3 lecture hours)
Applied Coastal Oceanography: SCI 366
This course will teach the student how different types of coastlines are molded from waves, tides and sediment supply. It will also show the different tools, methodologies, and applications that are available to the coastal surveying service industries. Group projects involve the preparation of technical/cost proposals to solve coastal geotechnical problems and, finally, to locate sunken treasure. (3 lecture hours)
Applied Genetics: SCI 370
"Applied Genetics" provides an in-depth understanding of the state of the art DNA technology and its applications in biological sciences, forensic sciences, environmental sciences, and paleontological and archeological studies. Both theoretical and experimental aspects of analyzing DNA from degraded issues will be emphasized. Current issues on molecular genetics and how genetic information is used in different scientific disciplines and their impact on student's future business career will also be emphasized.
Human Impact on Land and Life: SCI 371
Sec A 11:00 am - 12:15 pm TR Unistructure 345 Dan L. McNally
The human population, growing exponentially, is requiring an increasing amount of natural resources and generating a corresponding increase in wastes. The results are stressing our environment to the point of fatigue. This course covers environmental issues in land management, wildlife protection, and human health. Topics include an examination of the environmental problems presented by our technological development and growth. Tools and techniques for analysis in problem solving and risk assessment will be emphasized. Prerequisite: One science lecture course or permission of the instructor.
Artificial Intelligence and Robotics: SCI 373
Session Cycle Fall and Spring Yearly Cycle: Annual Can machines think? What does this really mean? This course provides an introduction to the topic of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. The lab part of the course provides hands-on experience in the making of thinking machines. The lecture part of the course will focus on the theory of artificial intelligence and robotics, but will also include some hands-on projects and competitions. The course (both the lab and lecture) will serve as an introduction to programming in Matlab, and the use of the robotic hardware. The course will present methods for solving difficult decision-making problems. The lecture and lab must be taken concurrently. Some programming experience is recommended.
Environmental Study in China: SCI 375
Scientific data are essential to evaluate, understand, and manage environmental problems. This course provides basic scientific information regarding environmental issues in the larger context of cross-cultural predicament. Through reading, discussion, and guest lectures, students will gain insights into the critical role that science and technologies have played in environmental studies. Using China as an example, this course offers an in-depth look into the environmental challenges that the country is facing. Students will learn how to assess scientific data behind environmental debates and will examine how environmental issues are connect to society and business. Prerequisite: At least one college level science course.
Special Topics in Science: SCI 385
Sec A 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Unistructure 345 Brian S. Blais
S.T.:Modern Space Science (contact instructor for description)
This course focuses on selected topics in science, particularly topics that might raise ethical issues, address technological breakthroughs or review recent scientific research. Activities may include specialized research or writing projects, discussion of issues, oral presentations, guest speakers, and field trips. Prerequisite: At least one college-level science course. (3 lecture hours)
Science Internship: SCI 391
The science internship provides the student with the opportunity to gain on-the-job experience and to apply scientific principles and procedures learned in the classroom in a work environment. The student is required to meet regularly with a faculty advisor, keep a daily log of activities, complete a paper or specific research project, and prepare an evaluation of the experience at the end of the internship.
Directed Study in Science: SCI 397
This course is tailored to fit the unique interests of a student interested in science. Faculty and student will design a program for the study of a practical aspect of science and/or technology. The end product of this study would be a paper describing the scientific methodology, results, and conclusions of the research, or the equivalent.
Honors: Special Topics in Science: SCI 399
Honors courses provide the opportunity for exceptional achievement. Instructors use methods and introduce concepts that will challenge the highly motivated student. Often interdisciplinary in approach and sometimes team taught, honors courses typically offer students occasions to extend their learning beyond the classroom. (3 lecture hours)
Environmental Policy: SCI 455
Sec A 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm TR Unistructure 376 Gaytha A. Langlois
This course will present an overview of environmental policy alternatives, emphasizing the interrelationship of science, business and government in policy formation and implementation. Global issues will be included, with special attention directed toward international efforts to achieve consensus on sustainable growth policies that encompass economic realities, technological innovation and a sensible legal and regulatory framework. (3 lecture hours) Prerequisite: At least one science course
Biotechnology Seminar: SCI 456
This course guides students to integrate the scientific and business aspects of their Bryant education. Under the supervision of the course instructor and other professionals from the biotechnology industry, students working in small groups will simulate the founding and management of the first ten years of a new biotechnology company. The simulation reflects the unique problems and challenges for biotechnology entrepreneurs and managers in evaluating the commercial potential of research ideas, marketing and business planning, financing, overcoming regulatory hurdles, consumer psychology, and ethical considerations. Students will make formal presentations on these subjects throughout the term as they build their companies. (3 lecture hours)
Special Topics in Science: SCI 485
This course focuses on selected topics in science, particularly topics that might raise ethical issues, address technological breakthroughs or review recent scientific research. Activities may include specialized research or writing projects, discussion of issues, oral presentations, guest speakers, and field trips. Prerequisite: At least one college-level science course. (3 lecture hours)
Directed Study in Science: SCI 497
This course is tailored to fit the unique interests of a student interested in science. Faculty and student will design a program for the study of a practical aspect of science and/or technology. The end product of this study would be a paper describing the scientific methodology, results, and conclusions of the research, or the equivalent.
Honors: Special Topics in Science: SCI 499
Honors courses provide the opportunity for exceptional achievement. Instructors use methods and introduce concepts that will challenge the highly motivated student. Often interdisciplinary in approach and sometimes team taught, honors courses typically offer students occasions to extend their learning beyond the classroom. (3 lecture hours)
Science Elective: SCI ELEC
Transfer equivalency for a science elective.
General Biology Laboratory: SCI L251
Sec A 8:00 am - 9:50 am W Unistructure 376 Eileen Levis
Sec B 8:00 am - 9:50 am R Unistructure 376 Eileen Levis
Sec C 10:00 am - 11:50 am R Unistructure 376 Eileen Levis
Sec D 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm R Unistructure 376 Eileen Levis
Sec JE 5:30 pm - 7:20 pm R Unistructure 376 Eileen Levis
This laboratory course is intended to complement the General Biology lecture course. Familiarity with a variety of organisms, techniques, and concepts is obtained through a direct, hands-on approach. Co-requisite: This course may only be taken concurrently with the lecture course; fulfills the laboratory requirement. (2 lab hours)
Physical Geology Laboratory: SCI L262
Sec A 8:00 am - 9:50 am T Unistructure 376 Dan L. McNally
Sec B 10:00 am - 11:50 am T Unistructure 376 Angelyn M. Phillips
Sec C 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm T Unistructure 376 Angelyn M. Phillips
Sec CE 5:30 pm - 7:20 pm T Unistructure 376 Michelle D. Coutu
This laboratory course complements Physical Geology. Familiarity with minerals, igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks will be gained through hands-on activities. Other exercises include plotting of earthquake epicenters and map reading. Co-requisite: This course may only be taken concurrently with the lecture course; fulfills the laboratory requirement. (2 lab hours)
Astronomy Laboratory: SCI L263
Sec A 7:20 pm - 9:10 pm T Unistructure 376
Sec B 7:20 pm - 9:10 pm R Francine Jackson
Session Cycle: Fall and Spring Yearly Cycle: Annual This laboratory course consists of a series of exercises and term projects designed to give the student an appreciation of the heavens and modern developments in astronomical science. The exercises will duplicate as closely as possible the research conducted by contemporary astronomers, using real data and similar types of analyses. A trip to an observatory is included in the course. Co-requisite: This course may only be taken concurrently with the lecture course; fulfills the laboratory requirement. (2 lab hours)
Physics Laboratory: SCI L264
Sec A 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm F Unistructure 376
Sec AH 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm F Unistructure 376
This laboratory course is designed to provide a better understanding of the physical principles studies in the lecture course. The work done here provides an opportunity to become familiar with the scientific methods of making experimental measurements and evaluating the results of these measurements. Co-requisites: This course may only be taken concurrently with the lecture course; fulfills the laboratory requirement. (2 lab hours)
Chemistry Laboratory: SCI L265
Sec A 8:00 am - 9:50 am M Dan L. McNally
Laboratory experimentation is the foundation of the science of chemistry. The "hands-on" experiments performed in this course will illustrate the principles, theories, and laws discussed in the lecture portion of the course. Co-requisite: This course may only be taken concurrently with the lecture course; fulfills the laboratory requirement. (2 lab hours)
Ecology Laboratory: SCI L351
Sec A 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm W Unistructure 376 Eileen Levis
This laboratory complements the Ecology: Theory and Applications lecture course. Ecosystem dynamics, including assessment of biotic and abiotic components, population growth patterns, species diversity and perturbation responses will be emphasized. Techniques and equipment commonly employed by professional ecologists will be stressed, using field studies, laboratory investigations, computer simulation, lab demonstrations, and site visits. Co-requisite: This course may only be taken concurrently with the lecture course; fulfills the laboratory requirements. (2 lab hours)
Energy Management Strategies Lab: SCI L355
Session Cycle: Fall and Spring Yearly Cycle: Annual This laboratory course complements Energy Management Strategies. Familiarity with a variety of non-renewable and renewable resources will be gained through hands-on activities. Exercises include evaluation of fossil fuel efficiency, computer simulations of resource allocation, and the design of a solar house. (2 lab hours)
Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Laboratory: SCI L373
SCIL373 is the laboratory portion of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. This lab must be taken concurrently with the lecture portion.
Environmental Study in China Laboratory: SCI L375
This lab course is designed to enhance the lecture portion and to provide a hands-on experience for environmental research in China. By traveling and conducting research as a group in a foreign country, the students will collect, analyze, and interpret scientific data on a variety of environmental problems. The study trip is also a unique opportunity to improve understanding of Chinese politics, culture, and history that are relevant to environmental issues.
Science Laboratory Elective: SCI LAB
Transfer equivalency for a science lab elective.
Science Mode of Thought: SCI MOT1
Transfer credit fulfills the Scientific Mode of Thought.
Scientific Mode of Thought: SCI MOT2
Transfer credit fulfills the Scientific Mode of Thought.
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(401) 232-6000

Webmaster: bblais@bryant.edu